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Alternative Press…

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After reading the chapter about alternative press, it was no surprise that women had ¬†difficult time getting their voices heard. During the 1970’s the feminist movement was in it’s prime. It sounds very hypocritical that “alternative print” was discriminative to women, after all many of their opinions and thoughts were at odds with the norm during this time. Women worked for underground papers but for the most part, they were contained to menial jobs. Their voices couldn’t be heard through current alternative press even though what they had to say was important to so many. What seemed like it could be an end to years of media repression and misrepresentation was actually another dead end for women in the media. That is until Spare Rib’ was started to two women who were tired of the repression. I would definitely say that a twenty year run was a successful form of alternative media. This magazine helped women connect with the movement and understand what was going on even if they felt unable to express their own feelings. They covered topics that wouldn’t normally be presented in the mainstream women magazines.

Something I found interesting about the alternative press in the UK was that at one point there were so many different papers and magazines that they had to fight for readers and paying advertisers.

One comment

  1. This is a nice post, Steph. I’ll have to tell Christine about it, and I’m adding the Spare Rib link to ours, under Alternative Journalism.

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