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Divergent voice becoming a little more mainstream

I was thinking last night about our class an divergent voices while looking at my twitter and I noticed that I follow a few.  The first one, which I still don’t understand why it took me so long to realize, is Chris Crocker.  You might know him from his “Leave Britney Alone” YouTube video that was seen everywhere even on the news.  Before this, Chris Crocker made many YouTube videos voicing his opinion on certain things that he found annoying or ridiculous.  He did it in a comical way and sometimes with a wig and make up on.  He got a pretty large following but then one day he made a video, the first he says that he wasn’t acting in, about how he loved Britney Spears and how people should leave her alone and stop criticizing her.  Chris Crocker was hysterically crying and yelling at his audience during this video.  After this, he was seen on the news, did interviews, and was seen on comedy central.  He isn’t mainstream, yet.  He is now recording music that may never be played on the radio but his EP raised quickly to the top three on the Electro charts on iTunes.  He also has been tweeting that he is doing readings for a TV pilot.  He went from doing what he calls “internet acting” to many people knowing his name.  After posting his video, many people made videos copying or making fun of the “Leave Britney Alone” video. 

Leave Britney Alone – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kHmvkRoEowc 

The other divergent voice I follow on Twitter is actually part of the mainstream, kind of.  Johnny Weir is a figure skater that has won many competitions and has his own book and reality show on LOGO.  What makes Johnny Weir a divergent voice is that he is looked down upon in the figure skating world by many people.  He likes to speak his mind and doesn’t really filter himself or keep quiet on things that other skaters do.  He complains about the federation that he skates for and complains about the rules, judging, etc.  Johnny Weir also likes to blur gender lines, he doesn’t skate in a way that is masculine or feminine but a combination.  His costumes also blur these lines.  While these things hold him back in some ways, because the federation wants him to color in the lines so to speak, it has created a large fan base for him of people who like his rebelious ways.  Some call him the Lady Gaga of figure skating.  Here is an example of his costumes, this is one of the costumes that blurs the lines a little less than others.

The last divergent voice that I follow is the host of a show also on LOGO.  This show is called RuPaul’s Drag Race.  The show is a reality competition show about a group of drag queens hoping to win money and other prizes.  This show is something that never would have happened years ago but now drag queens aren’t necessarily mainstream, yet.  The channel LOGO, is a divergent voice in its own but they do play shows such as Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Daria that were once very mainstream.  Although LOGO and all of it’s shows aren’t mainstream, yet, more and more people are starting to watch it or at least certain shows.  I keep saying yet because it is possible that these voices and these shows will become more mainstream.  Maybe it won’t be for a while but it is very likely that these people, shows, or channel will become part of the mainstream sooner or later.

2 comments

  1. I completely agree! I remember when the “Leave Britney Alone” videos came out, they were all anyone could talk about, including mainstream news stations. I think that they definitely provided his divergent voice with a platform, but now we rarely see him on anything. I think his mainstream presence was pretty short lived.

  2. I agree that it was short lived. I think that he is a good example of someone having their 15 minutes of fame. It was good to see a divergent voice get any recognition at all because I feel that it’s sadly a rare thing. When they do get recognition though, it either jump starts a career or they’re gone as quickly as they came, there isn’t really an in between.

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