NPR's On The Media

The Facebook Show Response

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This episode of On the Media heavily focuses on the life within Facebook. One writer, Rebecca MacKinnon even goes so far to regard Facebook as a country -“Facebookistan” to which she explains occupies 845 million people and run by a “sovereign who believes himself to be benevolent (Mark Zuckenberg)”.  Similar to any country Facebook has “laws”. MacKinnon goes in depth and describes the Facebook law of identity, saying that “Facebookistan” requires it’s people to use their real name or else they risk termination.

Surprisingly, Facebook has only been around for 8 years and available to non-college students for 6. The vast exposure and immediate growth of this social networking site makes one wonder whether Facebook will ever end.

We have reached a point in time in which it seems that if you do not have Facebook you are at a disadvantage. As said in this episode, Facebook is no longer just a sideline thing-it’s what you do. Facebook is the first tool to have majority of adults in the connected world using the same service.

Many people are involved in this service and even more are unaware of the actual content and information that exist within the site. For example, this episode describes how Facebook keeps track of what computer you log on and where. A lot of the information that you believe is gone is never actually deleted. I feel that it is very scary to be so involved in something and not actually have a clue of the information it actually holds about yourself. With all this information it can make one question the personal reason to why we log on and keep returning back to Facebook.

-Allyssa M

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