NPR's On The Media

the (non) art of film newscasts

Last week’s On The Media discussion about how Hollywood cannot seem to faithfully depict a newscast triggered a long and intense thought process in myself about my own film pet peeves. As they explained how Hollywood can make gun shots and wars seem so incredibly real yet simple newscasts so fake, I realized that there are also a lot of little things that make me nervous.

For one, I hate movie rain. Not only do I hate the fact that they usually use rain in very dramatic scenes, but I really don’t like the physical aspect of studio rain. It’s always a torrential, pouring kind of rain, and you can easily see it is only being directed at the characters.

Also, why does every main female character in a Romantic Comedy film have to have a lonely, funny, sometimes geeky-with-no-love-life-of-her-own best friend? I don’t get it. Or why is the romantic object of any hero in an Action film kidnapped? I understand these fixed roles sell movies… but Hollywood can afford to mix it up a bit, can’t they?

But, please, don’t get me wrong. The magic of movies will never leave me. There are things that blow my mind every time. For instance, I can never get enough of scenes that have few camera cuts. These long, progressive takes are so real and demand so much from the actors and the crew that I applaud each time. I can go on and on. But now a newscast in a movie for me will never be the same.

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