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The FBI Conspiracy

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This week’s “On the Media”, Trevor Aaronson, author of, “The Terror Factory: Inside the FBI’s Manufactured War on Terrorism” discusses the FBI’s role in counterterrorism. In the United States, American’s have become increasingly concerned with the efficiency of our terrorism procedures. Since the capture and kill of Osama Bin Laden, America’s military techniques and methods of defense have become more controversial.

In 2012 a man named Quazi Mohammad Rezwanul Ahsan Nafis was arrested after attempting to detonate a 1,000-pound bomb in front of New York City’s Federal Reserve. In an article published by New York Times, authors Mosi Secret and William K. Rashbaum, describe Nafis efforts to seek out others also interested in carrying out acts of terror. Unknowingly, Nafis came into contact with an FBI informant who subsequently encouraged him to recruit an undercover FBI agent. Following the FBI agent’s recruitment, he began plotting with Nafis and even provided him with resources.

In “On the Media” Trevor Aaronson expresses his views on FBI practices. He feels without resources and assistance from the FBI, these accused terrorists would not pursue an attack on their own. Aaronson depicts most infiltrated individuals as people who are “on the fringe of society” and incapable of committing acts of terrorism on their own. Additionally he describes the individuals we should fear such as Faisal Shahzad, who in 2010 attempted to set off a car bomb in New York City’s, Time Square.

Aaronson’s statements were somewhat conflicting when discussing whom we should devote our primary focus to. As violence and acts of terrorism have become more significant, it is difficult to fully agree with Aaronson. In today’s day and age people have become increasingly willing to carry out acts of terror without the help and, or resources of the FBI. Aaronson also states that many people are not capable of such acts. Yet people are unpredictable, and we won’t know whether Nafis or more recently accused Mohamed Osman Mohamud would have eventually given up on their mission? But is it really worth gambling with innocent lives?

-Gabrielle Escarrega

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