Syllabus

Instructor:  John Proctor

Spring 2018

Brownson 132

Email:   john.proctor@mville.edu

Office: Library 128

 

CAM3046

Convergent Media, Divergent Voices

Course Requirements

This seminar explores trends toward multimedia presentation and the convergence of print, broadcast and online media, and how these have influenced journalistic and creative discourse from the late 1960’s to the present. We discuss changes in social, political, and personal communication caused by the media’s rapid evolution, and consider the rise of online investigative media and recent blogging culture. The role of convergence in corporate media’s shrinking number of players in the mainstream is a concern, as are alternative media as viable divergent voices in the media landscape.

While we will be exploring some of the technologies that influence non-mainstream thought, this is not a technical course. Rather, we will be exploring the relationship of thought and media through a theoretical perspective (some of the larger meanings that are forming through this media shift) and a practical perspective (how you can become, or remain, involved). A typical week will involve roughly equal time with both, which means about half the time will be devoted to lecture and discussion, and the other half will be a more hands-on workshop of developing divergent voices, including our own.

We will also bring this theoretical and practical perspective to the conception of the mediated classroom. Students are welcome to bring and use laptops, smart phones, and other devices, under the understanding that they will be used as learning tools, rather than tools of distraction. We will operate on the understanding that mediated classroom etiquette is changing and developing as teaching and learning become more media-driven. I will set out some basic ground rules at the start of class, but we will also decide certain classroom norms together as we go along.

Required Reading & Listening

Bunk: The Rise of Hoaxes, Humbug, Plagiarists, Phonies, Post-Facts, and Fake News, Kevin Young ISBN 978-1-55597-791-7

The Social Media Reader, edited by Michael Mandiberg (Creative Commons licensed forfree download in most formats; we’ll read the introduction our first week, and I’ll most likely assign chapters periodically as issues arise in discussion)

NPR’s On the Media weekly podcast

The class blog and materials I will give you during the semester

Attendance and Grading Policy

Missing classes will have an increasingly negative impact on a student’s grade.  Two (2) latenesses equal one absence.  Attendance and participation make up a large portion of the final grade, so it is important that you show up on time and prepared to participate.

All assignments must be turned in on the due date.  Sports commitments and other extracurricular activities are not excused absences, and must be budgeted into the limited number of absences allowed.

GRADING RUBRIC:

Attendance & Participation, including online element      30%

Midterm Exam                                                                         10%

Podcast & Project Presentations                                          2×10%

Research Paper                                                                       20%

Semester Project                                                                    20%

SPECIAL NEEDS STUDENTS:

Students needing accommodations for a documented disability should notify the instructor and provide documentation as soon as possible at the beginning of the semester.

A NOTE ON PLAGIARISM & ACADEMIC HONESTY – We will discuss this further in class, but here it is in a nutshell: All written work and class presentations are to be in your own words, or with full and proper attribution of your sources.  The first instance of academic dishonesty will result in a failing grade for the assignment; a second instance will result in a failing grade for the course.  Any questionable work is subject to reporting to the Academic Writing Dean of the College.

Class Schedule

Date Texts Practice
Week 1: 1/22 & 1/25 On the Media samples

Social Media Reader, Introduction

A sampling of divergent voices in the media

Getting started on the class blog

Week 2:

1/29 & 2/1

 

Bunk, Ch1-2

On the Media

Design-based paradigm shifts

Overview of possibilities for student work in convergent media

Week 3:

2/5 & 2/8

Bunk, Ch3-4

On the Media

 

Text/Audio-based media

Podcast Presentations

Week 4:

2/12 & 2/15

Bunk, Ch5-6

On the Media

 

Image-based media

Podcast Presentations

Week 5:

2/19 & 2/22

Bunk, Ch7-8

On the Media

Radiolab (podcast): Smile My Ass

Video-based media

Podcast Presentations

Week 6:

2/26 & 3/1

 

Bunk, Ch9-10

On the Media

Review for Midterm

Music and media

Research Paper & Semester Project Introduced

Week 7:

3/5 & 3/8

NO CLASS MONDAY

MIDTERM EXAM

 

Date Texts Practice
Spring Break, 3/12 & 3/15 NO CLASSES
Week 8:

3/19 &3/22

Bunk, Ch11-12

On the Media

Development for Research Papers & Semester Projects
Week 9:

3/26 & 3/29

Bunk, Ch13-14

On the Media

Development for Research Papers & Semester Projects
Week 10:

4/2 & 4/5

Bunk, Ch15-16

On the Media

 

Critical Background Presentations

Work on Research Papers and Semester Projects

Week 11:

4/9 & 4/12

Bunk, Ch17-18

On the Media

 

Critical Background Presentations

Work on Research Papers and Semester Projects

Week 12:

4/16 & 4/19

Bunk, Ch19-20

On the Media

Critical Background Presentations

Work on Research Papers and Semester Projects

Week 13:

4/23 & 4/26

Bunk, Ch21-22

On the Media

 

RESEARCH PAPERS DUE

 

Week 14:

4/30 & 5/3

Bunk, Coda

 

SEMESTER PROJECTS DUE
Week 15:

5/7 & 5/10

FINAL: Project Showcase

A NOTE ON PLAGIARISM & ACADEMIC HONESTY – We will discuss this further in class, but here it is in a nutshell: All written work and class presentations are to be in your own words, or with full and proper attribution of your sources. The first instance of academic dishonesty will result in a failing grade for the assignment; a second instance will result in a failing grade for the course. Any questionable work is subject to reporting to the Academic Writing Dean of the College.

 

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